“What you always do before you make a decision is consult. The best public policy is made when you are listening to people who are going to be impacted. Then, once a policy is determined, you call on them to help you sell it.”
— Elizabeth Dole

News - 23 Sep 2021

Georgia wins put Schumer in control of Senate, Democrats in charge of committee agenda
The double wins in Georgia put Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., in charge of the Senate with the slimmest of majorities, in a big boost to President-elect Joe Biden's agenda. More
Elaine Chao to resign as transportation secretary in wake of riot
Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao is resigning, a White House official and a person familiar with the situation tell CNN. More
After Capitol riots, AOC demands Cruz, Hawley resign from the Senate
More
Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao resigns after Capitol rioting
Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao announced Thursday that she is stepping down from her post, a day after the rioting on Capitol Hill -- making her the latest member of the administration to resign over Trump’s conduct, and the first Cabinet member to do so. More
West Virginia lawmaker under pressure to resign after recording himself storming the US Capitol
A Republican lawmaker from West Virginia is being pressured to resign after posting and then deleting a video from social media of himself storming the nation's Capitol building Wednesday with hundreds of other pro-Trump protesters.  More

Ending Intimate Partner Violence In America:
Healing and Empowering Survivors

Key Speakers

Alicia Nichols, Deputy Director, National Domestic Violence and Firearms Resource Center, Battered Women's Justice Project
Amy Bleser, Director of Hamilton County Direct Services, Women Helping Women
Barbara Paradiso, Director of the Center on Domestic Violence, School of Public Affairs, University of Colorado Denver
Lynn Hecht Schafran, JD, Legal Director and Director, National Judicial Education Program, Legal Momentum
Dorian Karp, Advocacy and Policy Director, Jewish Women International
Joe Gallant, Project S.A.F.E Prevention Specialist, Rose Brooks Center

This event was held on Wednesday, June 30th 2021.

Overview

Intimate partner violence (IPV) affects over 20 people per minute. Data from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NIPSVS) show that nearly 1 in 4 women and 1 in 9 men reported experiencing severe physical violence from an intimate partner in their lifetime. Moreover, 16% of women and 7% of men have experienced sexual violence. 10% of women and 2% of men also report stalking by an intimate partner and nearly half of US adults have experienced psychological aggression such as humiliating or controlling behaviors from their partner. IPV can cause severe physical and emotional distress for survivors who are more likely to become suicidal and lose economic opportunities from the abuse. Children who witness abuse are likely to experience abuse themselves and are often used to control other family members which can have life long impacts on their mental health. Aside from the obvious physical and emotional trauma inflicted, IPV contributes to over 10% of all intentional violent deaths (not including suicide) and costs America over 8 billion dollars a year.

Its prevalence is not equally felt as racial/ethnic and sexual minority communities are disproportionately impacted by IPV. Data from the NIPSVS shows that the lifetime prevalence of experiencing stalking, sexual or physical violence by an intimate partner is 57% among multi-racial women, 48% among American Indian/Alaska Native women, 45% among non-Hispanic Black women, 37% among non-Hispanic White women, 34% among Hispanic women and 18% among Asian/Pacific Islander women. It should be be noted that Native Americans are uniquely at risk as Native Women are three times more likely to experience sexual violence than any other ethnic group and over 84% of them have experienced intimate partner violence at one point in their life according to the National Coalition Against Domest violence. Non-citizens also face unique challenges reporting violence because they fear how reaching out to the police could affect their immigration status. Additionally, the NISVS special report on victimization by sexual orientation demonstrates that some sexual minorities are also disproportionately affected by IPV victimization; 61% of bisexual women, 37% of bisexual men, 44% of lesbian women, 26% of gay men, 35% of heterosexual women, and 29% of heterosexual men experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking from an intimate partner in their lifetimes. Transgender individuals are also 1.7 times more likely to experience IPV than their cisgender counterparts in part because of the lack of legal protections and barriers to social services they face.

The government has made strong progress addressing this issue in the past like passing the Violence Against Women Act which provides tools for holding offenders accountable, and sets up measures for data collection to learn more about these crimes however, it hasn’t been reinstated since 2019 when the GOP led senate failed to bring it to a vote. Between the pandemic, extending protections for transgender individuals and growing evidence that there is a strong link between guns and IPV related deaths it is clear that is a lot more work ahead of us to address this issue.

This timely symposium provides an invaluable opportunity for case managers, social workers, community outreach specialists, healthcare and mental health practitioners, and other key stakeholders to reflect on progress made, identify challenges and consider next steps in addressing intimate partner violence in America. Cross-sector exchange will help facilitate better partnerships between civil society, the private sector and government actors. It will allow delegates to consider solutions to identified barriers and challenges related to policy implementation. Participants will be able to transfer key learnings and best practices to their own communities whether at the local, state or national level.

 

Delegates Will:

  • Identify Restorative Methods to Healing Survivors
  • Learn to Take a Survivor Centric Approach to Responding to Violence
  • Examine Techniques to Address the Unique Needs of Underprivileged Populations
  • Discuss How To Use Online Tools to Address Violence
  • Explore How to Talk to Young People About Healthy Relationships
  • Share Strategies to Improve Screening and Connecting Survivors to Resources
  • Debate Which Reforms to Our Legal System and Social Services Could Best Serve Survivors
  • Consider Legislative Opportunities to Seize With Our New Congress
  • Discuss How to Protect and Treat Children Who Witness or Experience Abuse

Program

 

9:30  Chair's Welcome and Introduction
9:40

Speaker Presentations and Q&A  

  • Identify Restorative Methods to Healing Survivors
  • Learn to Take a Survivor Centric Approach to Responding to Violence
  • Examine Techniques to Address the Unique Needs of Underprivileged Populations
  • Discuss How To Use Online Tools to Address Violence
  • Explore How to Talk to Young People About Healthy Relationships
  • Share Strategies to Improve Screening and Connecting Survivors to Resources
  • Debate Which Reforms to Our Legal System and Social Services Could Best Serve Survivors
  • Consider Legislative Opportunities to Seize With Our Newly Elected Congress
  • Discuss How to Protect and Treat Children Who Witness or Experience Abuse

 12:30

Open Floor Discussion and Debate
  13:00 Chair's Summary and Closing Comments
  13:10 Close **All Times as Presented are in the Pacific Time Zone**

Who Should Attend?

  • Domestic violence counselors
  • Department of Health and Human Services
  • Social workers
  • Community outreach specialists
  • Relocation service managers/Caseworkers
  • Benefits advocates
  • Community programs advocates
  • Family service coordinators
  • Family care coordinators
  • Youth advocates
  • Mental health clinicians/ specialists
  • Treatment/Substance abuse specialists
  • Public health managers/Administrators
  • City council representatives
  • City managers
  • County representatives
  • Non-profit organizations
  • Healthcare professionals
  • Law enforcement
  • Community programs advocates
  • Mental health recovery managers/officers
  • Mental health consultants
  • Behavioral specialists
  • Child and family specialists
  • Child advocacy managers
  • Mental health technicians
  • Health and wellness advisors
  • Psychiatrists
  • Therapists
  • Clinicians
  • Nurses
  • Indian child welfare/education specialists
  • Researchers and academics
  • Police Officers
  • Doctors
  • Educators
  • Child psychologists
This event was held on Wednesday, June 30th 2021.

Sponsorship and Exhibition Opportunities

If you’re interested in promoting your company, products and/or services at our events, please click here to enter your details and we will contact you directly. Alternatively, please call
(424) 252-4716 for more information.

How to Book

(424) 252-4716
bookings.at.publicpolicyexchange.com