“What you always do before you make a decision is consult. The best public policy is made when you are listening to people who are going to be impacted. Then, once a policy is determined, you call on them to help you sell it.”
— Elizabeth Dole

News - 23 Sep 2021

Georgia wins put Schumer in control of Senate, Democrats in charge of committee agenda
The double wins in Georgia put Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., in charge of the Senate with the slimmest of majorities, in a big boost to President-elect Joe Biden's agenda. More
Elaine Chao to resign as transportation secretary in wake of riot
Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao is resigning, a White House official and a person familiar with the situation tell CNN. More
After Capitol riots, AOC demands Cruz, Hawley resign from the Senate
More
Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao resigns after Capitol rioting
Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao announced Thursday that she is stepping down from her post, a day after the rioting on Capitol Hill -- making her the latest member of the administration to resign over Trump’s conduct, and the first Cabinet member to do so. More
West Virginia lawmaker under pressure to resign after recording himself storming the US Capitol
A Republican lawmaker from West Virginia is being pressured to resign after posting and then deleting a video from social media of himself storming the nation's Capitol building Wednesday with hundreds of other pro-Trump protesters.  More

Restoring Faith in US Elections:
Improving Security and Expanding Access

Date of Event: Friday, October 29th 2021

Time of Event: 11:30 AM — 3:30 PM

Place of Event: Webinar

Key Speakers

Pamela Smith, Senior Advisor, Verified Voting
Kyle Taylor, Founder and Director, Fair Vote UK
Mindy Romero, Professor, Founder, and Director, the Center for Inclusive Democracy at the USC Price School of Public Policy
Thomas Hicks, Commissioner, United States Election Assistance Commission

Overview

Having a strong democratic system that voters can believe in is integral to the protection of all other rights in America. However, we are currently facing a crisis of confidence in our elections with many threats to our faith in the system present. First and perhaps most disturbing is that many voters believe that our system is rife with fraud with about a third of voters believing that President Biden won because of electoral fraud. Although you are more likely to get struck by lightning than commit voter fraud, there are real security risks that must be addressed. According to a 2020 report conducted by the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), Russian and Iranian hacking campaigns actually did compromise some of the networks that managed some of our elections and several organizations, candidates and campaigns. Computers and software are present in nearly every component of the democratic process which means so are the vulnerabilities. While this didn’t affect the outcome of our national elections, local and state infrastructure have significantly less resources to defend themselves from interference. 

Aside from outside interference, ensuring that every voter exercises their right is fraught with its own challenges. Most people have to register before they can vote however this process has often left America’s underprivileged out. Voter ID laws also severely impact people of color and lower income Americans who have difficulty accessing government ID and those who register voters often have to undergo rigorous and expensive training. Even when people do successfully register to vote many of these people are disproportionately impacted by voter purges that remove people from voter rolls. While vote by mail (VBM) has been invaluable to running elections during this pandemic, access to VBM isn’t equal. From difficulties accessing VBM ballots, to burdensome requirements that make casting VBM ballots impractical or impossible, to higher rates of rejection of completed VBM ballots, at each stage of the vote-by-mail process, many underprivileged communities are excluded from the process.Voters are sometimes misinformed about the process and their own rights making it difficult to vote in every part of the process. Although the Biden administration and congress have made legislative efforts to strengthen voting rights, change has been elusive and it is up to state and local policy makers to take this matter into their own hands. 

This timely symposium provides an invaluable opportunity for election officials, advocates, cybersecurity professionals, and other key stakeholders to reflect on progress made, identify challenges and consider next steps in securing the right to vote for everyone. Cross-sector exchange will help facilitate better partnerships between civil society, the private sector and government actors. It will allow delegates to consider solutions to identified barriers and challenges related to policy implementation. Participants will be able to transfer key learnings and best practices to their own communities whether at the local, state or national level.

 

Delegates Will:

  • Share strategies to adapt election procedures in lieu of the pandemic

  • Explore ways to keep voters well informed of their rights and the election process 

  • Deliberate methods to improve cybersecurity protocol among local, state, and federal election officials

  • Discuss how to make the voter registrations process more accessible and safe

  • Consider ways to make Vote by Mail (VBM) procedures more robust and equitable

  • Discuss how different sectors could collaborate to improve the voting process

  • Identify potential public-private partnerships between local and state officials and cybersecurity professionals

  • Develop plans to tackle misinformation and other voter suppression efforts

Program

 

11:30  Chair's Welcome and Introduction
11:40

Speaker Presentations and Q&A  

  • Share strategies to adapt election procedures in lieu of the pandemic
  • Explore ways to keep voters well informed of their rights and the election process
  • Deliberate methods to improve cybersecurity protocol among local, state, and federal election officials
  • Discuss how to make the voter registrations process more accessible and safe
  • Consider ways to make Vote by Mail (VBM) procedures more robust and equitable
  • Discuss how different sectors could collaborate to improve the voting process
  • Identify potential public-private partnerships between local and state officials and cybersecurity professionals
  • Develop plans to tackle misinformation and other voter suppression efforts

 

 3:00

Open Floor Discussion and Debate
 3:25 Chair's Summary and Closing Comments
 3:30 Close **All Times as Presented are in the Pacific Time Zone**

Who Should Attend?

  • FEC Officials 

  • Voting Rights Advocates 

  • State and Local Election Officials 

  • Election Assistance Commission Officials 

  • Election Commissioners 

  • Cybersecurity professionals

  • Department of Justice Officials 

  • Secretary Of State Elections Division Officials

  • Supervisor or Chief Poll Workers 

  • County Clerks

  • City and County Elections Commissioners 

  • County Recorders

  • County Clerk Recorders

  • Voter Registration Non-Profits 

  • Department of Motor Vehicles Administrators 

  • State and Local Ethics Commission Officials 

  • Board of Elections Officials

  • Lawyers and Attorneys 

  • Academics and Researchers 

Sponsorship and Exhibition Opportunities

If you’re interested in promoting your company, products and/or services at our events, please click here to enter your details and we will contact you directly. Alternatively, please call
(424) 252-4716 for more information.

How to Book

(424) 252-4716
bookings.at.publicpolicyexchange.com